Dr. Jonathan S. Abramowitz, Ph.D.
Clinical Psychologist ● Consultant ● Educator ● Researcher ● Author

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  Phone: 919-843-8170
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  Anxiety disorders
  OCD
  CBT
 


Consultation

  • What kind of anxiety problem do you have?
  • How severe is it?
  • What is the best form of treatment?
  • How helpful will treatment be for your problem?

These kinds of questions are addressed in an initial consultation visit that often sets the stage for treatment (although some people seek psychological consultations while not necessarily seeking follow-up treatment services). During this visit, I will spend time carefully evaluating your current difficulties, level of functioning, and history. The goal of this evaluation is to fully understand the problem--and the context in which it is occurring--so that decisions about appropriate treatment can be made. Techniques used in the evaluation include a thorough clinical interview and often the administration of paper and pencil symptom questionnaires and tests. I might ask you to complete some questionnaires on your own and bring them to the consultation.

Once the interview is complete, I will discuss my impressions with you (and if you wish, with any close friends of family members). This feedback session involves information about the nature of the problem, possible causal factors, and recommendations for treatment. Since education is an important goal of consultation, I encourage you to ask any questions you might have. Your input will play a role when discussing the pros and cons of different types of treatment.

There are generally 3 possible outcomes of the initial consultation:

  1. The patient is a good candidate for treatment and decides to begin therapy,

  2. The patient is a good candidate for treatment, yet decides not to begin therapy at this point, or

  3. The patient is not a good candidate for treatment at this time and a referral is made.